Event Type: 
Section Meeting
Event Date: 
Tuesday, September 19, 2017 - 18:30 to 21:30
Location: 
Sony Electronics
1730 North First Street
95112 San Jose, CA
United States
Event Details: 

TOPIC:  Augmented Reality has existed in science fiction and research labs for decades, and is now becoming accessible to consumers on their mobile devices. Fully immersive AR, where the experience moves from a phone screen and into our world via glasses (or contact lenses, or brain implants) is still a few years off, but devices are available today that allow us to prototype what the future might feel like.

Carl will share lessons learned from ETC student projects exploring the use of interactive agents in immersive Augmented Reality, and ideas for where the future of AR interfaces might be headed. Project platforms have included Epson Moverio glasses, Microsoft’s Hololens, VR headsets, and even a head mounted Tango tablet.

PRESENTER: Carl Rosendhal.

Carl is an Associate Professor at Carnegie Mellon’s Entertainment Technology Center, and is the Director of the ETC’s Silicon Valley satellite campus. Since joining CMU in 2008, Carl has worked with hundreds of Masters students as both an instructor and advisor on 50+ projects in VR, AR, mobile games and applications, connected TV, and other areas at the junction of technology, entertainment and design. He also teaches a class in entrepreneurship specifically around entertainment technologies. Carl founded Pacific Data Images (PDI) in 1980 and ran the computer animation company until its sale to DreamWorks in 2000. In 1998 he and his co-founders were recognized with a Technical Achievement Academy Award for PDI’s contribution to modern filmmaking.  He was a founding board member of the Visual Effects Society (VES), and chaired the organization from 2004 through 2006.

Refreshments will be provided.

IMPORTANT NOTICE

Please DO NOT park in the parking structure behind the buildings. The gates close at 7pm and it will be difficult to get your cars out.

Please feel free to use ANY of the surface spaces around the two buildings.