<img height="1" width="1" src="https://www.facebook.com/tr?id=414634002484912&amp;ev=PageView &amp;noscript=1">
Get Started
    Webcast

    H.264 versus HEVC versus VP9

    November 20, 2014 12:00 AM

    AVC (H.264) addressed many of the shortcomings of predecessor compression standards like MPEG-2 that were predominately aimed at linear scheduled broadcast. This enabled the needs of HD and streaming applications to be efficiently addressed with the necessary functionality and crucially, tight bandwidth constraints dictated by their respective distribution media.

    Innovation was demanded by the standards bodies to further improve on compression efficiency of the existing compression standards by as much as 50% to facilitate the introduction of 4K / Ultra HD as well increase the reach of Over The Top (OTT) services. All this activity surrounding compression formats begs the questions, what is the technology behind these standards, what are their target markets, how are they related and lastly are they gaining market traction?

    Please join SMPTE and Ian Trow, Senior Director Emerging Technology and Strategy at Harmonic, for this very timely webcast!

     

    Guest Speaker: Ian Trow

    IanTrowIan Trow, Senior Director Emerging Technology and Strategy, Harmonic

    Ian has worldwide responsibility for emerging technology and strategy for Harmonic.

    This currently includes:

    High Efficiency Video Coding
    4K / Ultra HD
    Targeted Advertising
    Virtualization
    Software & Cloud Based Solutions

    He has over 20 years of systems and design experience in High Definition and MPEG video products. Ian’s previous roles to Harmonic were at Thomson (Director of Compression Technology) and Envivio (VP of Technology & Marketing).

    Ian was at Tandberg Television for 9 years, as Engineering Group Manager working on MPEG-2 broadcast encoders, and later moving to become Segment and Product Manager with responsibility for satellite, terrestrial, and IP delivery of compressed material. Before Tandberg, he was a design engineer at Snell & Wilcox and Sony Broadcast.